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ReliefWeb - Updates on Philippines

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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    By Darcy Knoll, Emergency Communications Coordinator for CARE International in the Philippines

    It’s around nine o’clock in the morning at the centre of the village of Sulod, Samar region, in the Philippines. The weather is warm already and the bright sun leaves promise it will be hotter still midday. We’ve gathered here for a food distribution, organized by CARE with its local partner OCCCI as part of emergency efforts to assist those affected by super typhoon Haiyan.

    Volunteer crews, survivors themselves, unload boxes and bags of corned beef, sardines, salt, sugar, mongo beans, cooking oil, dried fish and rice.

    Standing patiently waiting is a group of women and men of varying ages, mothers holding babies, grandchildren supporting elderly grandparents.

    Delecia Cabuquit, 65, pleasantly chats with neighbours as she waits. She was at home with her 87-year-old mother the day the typhoon struck. The two went up to the second floor of her home to wait out the storm and prayed the rosary. “I’m still praying,” she adds.

    Heavy winds tore off her roof and flood waters in the seaside village filled the bottom floor of her home. Eventually, the water left and, while shaken, they began to recover.

    The last two months have been hard though, she says, especially supporting her mother.

    Distributing Food

    A voice over a megaphone, the crowd perks up to await instructions. Christianity is dominant here like much of the rest of the country, and so they say three short prayers together and the distribution begins.

    Thanks to the support of its generous donors, CARE was able to work with its partners to provide emergency food assistance to hard-hit communities shortly following the storm. Since then, CARE has distributed food to roughly 88,000 people in the areas of Panay, Leyte and Samar.

    The crowd is calm, patient, composed. Everyone waits for their name to be called and then proceeds with their plastic bag to receive their cans of corned beef, sardines and other items. It’s enough food to feed a family of five for two weeks or more.

    For some, the bags of rice are too heavy to lift, but community members help each other out and carry the 25 kilogram bags or load them on a tricycle to be taken home. Part of the strategy behind choosing the location of this distribution is to ensure it’s in the centre of the community, close to people’s homes so they don’t have to carry the items far. This is especially important for woman and the elderly.

    These storm survivors are extremely thankful for the food they’ve received. They say so repeatedly to anyone associated with the process, a thank you they clearly want passed on to all involved in supporting CARE’s work. As more markets begin to open and the recovery continues, CARE will look to phase out its food distributions and shift its focus to helping restore livelihoods for the most vulnerable people, so they can meet their own food needs.

    A New Year Begins

    A new year has begun and, despite many challenges, there is a sense of optimism when meeting and talking with various people. After all, today is the first day of school since the storm. Ruby Labiran Ragoro, 41, a teacher at the nearby Basey 1 Central Elementary School, stands confident with the food bag she just received. She says she is happy to be back teaching again. It’s good for the kids to regain this sense of normalcy, she adds, although they still see debris from the storm outside their classroom.

    “We’re recovering, we need to,” says Ruby. “The effect of the typhoon is lessened because of good hearted people helping us recover and helping us stand again.”

    Find out more about our emergency response to survivors of typhoon Haiyan [here.](http://www.care-international.org/what-we-do/emergency-response/spotlight-typhoon-haiyan.aspx

    CAREs emergency response: CARE is working with partners to deliver emergency relief in three areas of the Philippines: Leyte, Samar and Panay. Our target is to reach 200,000 people with food, shelter, other assistance, and help communities recover in the months and years to come. One month after the typhoon, CARE had provided food to more than 40,000 people and shelter materials (shelter kits, tarpaulins and kitchen sets) to more than 20.000 individuals. Over the coming months, CARE will provide assistance in rebuilding livelihoods and longer term shelter.


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    Three months after Typhoon Haiyan devastated central Philippines, international humanitarian organisation CARE Australia is increasingly concerned that many survivors remain unable to earn an income to support their families.  

    The super typhoon, which hit the island nation on 8 November last year, affected more than 16 million people, leaving over four million living in makeshift or temporary shelters, more than 6,000 people dead and many more still missing. 

    Haiyan also affected an estimated 5.9 million workers, and in a region reliant on agriculture and fishing, caused $723 million in damages to crops, livestock, fisheries and agricultural infrastructure. An estimated 33 million coconut trees were also either damaged or destroyed, affecting more than one million farmers.  

    CARE’s Typhoon Haiyan recovery work is now focussing on helping the families restore their livelihoods, such as vegetable farming, rice production, fishing and other income‐ generating activities. 

    This work will support some of the most vulnerable families, including female‐led households.  ‘Leyte, Samar and Panay, the islands in central Philippines where CARE’s efforts are targetted, have long been considered some of the poorest parts of the country. Typhoon Haiyan made this situation much worse,’ says Lex Kassenberg, CARE‘s Country Director for the Philippines. 

    ‘Imagine losing not only your home, but your only source of income at the same time. That’s the reality of what many thousands of typhoon-affected families are living with right now, making recovery incredibly difficult.’ 

    CARE will be providing vulnerable families with training, support and cash assistance to help them restart previous employment or diversify into new activities to earn an income.   ‘The goal of CARE’s livelihood assistance in central Philippines is to help typhoon survivors meet their basic needs, and begin to earn additional income for the future,’ said Mr Kassenberg. ‘Helping them earn a living is critical to ensuring they can feed their families, rebuild their homes and get back on their feet.’  CARE’s work to restore livelihoods is in conjunction with emergency relief efforts which have been underway since Typhoon Haiyan struck three months ago. CARE’s response has so far reached over 200,000 people, with food to more than 185,000 people, emergency shelter material (tools, tarpaulins, kitchen sets and other items) to over 36,000 people, and high‐quality shelter repair kits including corrugated metal sheeting, tools and other necessary material plus an additional cash supplement to over 3,800 people. 

    Australians wishing to support families affected by Typhoon Haiyan can donate at www.care.org.au/haiyan.

    A donation of $130 can provide 10 food baskets for families and $390 can provide materials for two high‐quality shelter repair kits (including corrugated sheeting, specialised nails and other useful items) along with a cash supplement to help families rebuild their home. 

    CARE Australia is an international humanitarian aid organisation fighting poverty, with a special focus on working with women and girls to bring lasting change to their communities. CARE has worked in the Philippines since 1949, providing emergency relief and helping communities prepare for future disasters. Visit www.care.org.au. 


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    Feb. 7, 2014

    Three months since Typhoon Haiyan slammed the Philippines, humanitarian organization CARE is increasingly concerned too many survivors remain without the means to meet their basic needs.

    This month, CARE will expand its emergency programming to focus on helping vulnerable families restore such livelihoods as vegetable farming, rice production, fishing and other income-generating activities.

    The disaster, which hit the island nation last Nov. 8 and 9, affected some 5.9 million workers, 2.6 million of whom have been identified as most vulnerable.

    According to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, Haiyan caused $723 million in total damages to agriculture. This includes $629 million in damages to crops, livestock and fisheries. An estimated 33 million coconut trees were also either damaged or destroyed, affecting more than one million farmers.

    “This region has long been considered one of the poorest parts of the country. Typhoon Haiyan made this situation much worse,” says Lex Kassenberg, country director for CARE Philippines. “Imagine losing your only source of income and then losing your house at the same time. That’s what too many typhoon-affected families are living with right now, which makes it incredibly difficult to recover.”

    As part of its programming, CARE will provide cash assistance to vulnerable families to restart previous livelihoods or diversify into new activities to earn an income. CARE will also work with its local partners to empower families with further training and support.

    “The goal of CARE’s livelihood assistance is to enable families to meet their basic needs, while earning additional income for the future,” says Kassenberg. “Restarting livelihoods is essential to help survivors feed their families and rebuild their homes.”

    This livelihood programming is meant to complement CARE’s other emergency activities taken since the typhoon struck three months ago. CARE has been working with partners to deliver emergency assistance to a total of 250,000 people in three areas of the Philippines: Leyte, Samar and Panay.

    So far, these operations have reached over 200,000 people. CARE has provided food relief to more than 185,000 people, emergency shelter material (tools, tarps, kitchen sets and other items) to over 36,000 people, and high quality shelter repair kits including corrugated metal sheeting, tools and other necessary material plus an additional cash supplement to over 3,800 people.

    For more information or to arrange an interview, please contact:

    Darcy Knoll

    Emergency Communications Coordinator

    CARE International in the Philippines

    +63 917 510 8093

    darcy.knoll@care.ca

    ABOUT CARE:

    CARE has worked in the Philippines since 1949, providing emergency relief and helping communities prepare for future disasters. CARE’s past responses in the Philippines have included Typhoon Bopha in 2012 and Typhoon Ketsana in 2009. Founded in 1945 with the creation of the CARE Package, CARE is a leading humanitarian organization fighting global poverty. CARE has more than six decades of experience delivering emergency aid during times of crisis. Our emergency responses focus on the needs of the most vulnerable populations, particularly girls and women. Last year, CARE worked in 84 countries and reached more than 83 million people around the world.


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    ATLANTA — Six months after Typhoon Haiyan slammed the central Philippines, the global humanitarian organization CARE is expanding its efforts to help survivors rebuild their homes and livelihoods.

    “Some good strides have been made in the transition from an emergency to early recovery phase,” says Lex Kassenberg, CARE’s country director in the Philippines. “Still, too many families in the worst-hit areas continue to live in makeshift shelters, while many of those who have started to rebuild or repair their damaged houses have yet to complete their homes.”

    An estimated 2 million people are still without durable shelter and remain at risk, especially in light of the 2014 typhoon season which begins next month. CARE is expanding its shelter program by providing additional cash assistance to the most vulnerable of its earlier beneficiaries to allow them to complete their shelters by buying materials they still lack such as lumber to finish their walling.

    CARE initially provided emergency shelter materials such as tarpaulins and other non-food items during the first crucial months following the disaster. In January 2014 CARE began distributing shelter repair kits to the most vulnerable households in remote areas in Leyte and Panay, reaching more than 55,000 people in more than 12,000 households. Shelter repair kits are composed of building materials such as corrugated sheets, specialized nails, hammers, aluminium screens and other items. Coupled with cash assistance equal to $68, beneficiaries were able to construct their homes’ foundation and roofing consistent with safe-building techniques.

    Along with these successes have come additional challenges. In the last three months affected households have begun to grapple with the double burden of rebuilding their homes, mostly from scratch, while also trying to restore their livelihoods. Inevitably this divides their focus and even drains their energy.

    In order to ease the twin burdens of the survivors, CARE is gearing up its efforts through its recently launched early livelihood recovery programs. CARE is targeting 25,000 household beneficiaries across Leyte, Samar and Panay with cash transfers of $68. The cash grant will allow beneficiaries to restore their livelihoods destroyed by Haiyan, or venture into new income-generating activities.

    “Simultaneously working on shelter and livelihood programs will help CARE strengthen and sustain the recovery process of our beneficiaries”, says Kassenberg.

    From food distribution during the emergency phase to its shelter and livelihood programs, CARE has so far reached more than 300,000 beneficiaries in nearly 65,000 households across Leyte, Samar and Panay, surpassing its initial target of 200,000 beneficiaries.

    CARE is committed to the Haiyan response in the months and years to come to help rebuild lives.

    ABOUT CARE:

    CARE has worked in the Philippines since 1949, providing emergency relief and helping communities prepare for future disasters. CARE’s past responses in the Philippines have included Typhoon Bopha in 2012 and Typhoon Ketsana in 2009. Founded in 1945 with the creation of the CARE Package, CARE is a leading humanitarian organization fighting global poverty. CARE has more than six decades of experience delivering emergency aid during times of crisis. Our emergency responses focus on the needs of the most vulnerable populations, particularly girls and women. Last year, CARE worked in 87 countries and reached more than 97 million people around the world. To learn more, visit www.care.org.

    Contact:

    Winnie Aguilar - Communications Officer, CARE Philippines - +63 917 510 8093 | winnie.aguilar@care.org


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    Six months after one of the largest typhoons ever recorded, many survivors are struggling to earn AUD $2.50 a day, aid organisation CARE Australia says.

    Typhoon Haiyan, which hit the Philippines on 8 November last year, affected more than 14 million people, leaving more than 6,000 dead and forcing more than four million people into makeshift or temporary shelter.

    The ‘super typhoon’ also caused an estimated $723 million in damages to crops, livestock, fisheries and agricultural infrastructure in central Philippines.

    ‘Six months on, many typhoon survivors are struggling to earn enough to get by. There is considerably less work available now compared to before Haiyan, and many people have started farm labouring, often earning 100 to 150 pesos a day (between AUD $2.40 and $3.60),’ said Lex Kassenberg, CARE’s Country Director in the Philippines.

    ‘With crops needing many months before they begin to produce yields, Haiyan survivors are starting basic businesses such as small grocery stalls or material weaving to earn a small income to help feed and clothe their families. CARE’s priority is to give these people a helping hand to re-start their livelihoods.’

    CARE is now providing grants and support to help survivors return to work in communities throughout Panay and Samar, two of the islands hardest hit by the typhoon. Mr Kassenberg said many communities were pooling funds and were investing in small businesses that will provide a reliable income for many families.

    ‘Families are coming together to build small vegetable or pig farms to help generate an income for their barangay (village). Our focus is on helping these communities support each other through the recovery.’

    Reflecting on the progress made since November, Mr Kassenberg said the last six months had demonstrated both the resilience of the Filipino people and the generosity of the region to support those in desperate need.

    Yet he added the process of recovery would be long. ‘Since the response began, CARE has reached more than 300,000 people – around 65,000 families – with food, shelter and support to rebuild their lives.’

    ‘Yet while Filipinos are extraordinarily resilient people, recovery from a disaster of this magnitude is not simply about timber and nails, bricks and mortar. Our focus now is on giving survivors the means to earn an income, to ensure that in three, six, 12 and 18 months’ time, they will continue to be able to put food on the table.’

    He added that the response from Australians to CARE’s Typhoon Haiyan Appeal had been outstanding. ‘Australians have shown remarkable generosity through their support for CARE’s response in the Philippines.

    This support has, and will continue to be, crucial to helping families recover.’ Australians wishing to support families affected by Typhoon Haiyan can donate at www.care.org.au/typhoonhaiyan. $73 can help a family restart their income by building a vegetable farm, replanting rice or raising livestock such as chickens or goats.

    CARE Australia is an international humanitarian aid organisation fighting poverty, with a special focus on working with women and girls to bring lasting change to their communities. CARE has worked in the Philippines since 1949, providing emergency relief and helping communities prepare for future disasters. www.care.org.au.

    Interviews with CARE representatives in Philippines and Australia are available.
    For more information please contact CARE Australia Media Advisor Tom Perry (0419 567 777)


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    Source: ActionAid, Adventist Development and Relief Agency International, Australian Council for International Development, Caritas Australia, CARE, RedR, Oxfam, Save the Children, Plan, World Vision, ChildFund International
    Country: Australia, Philippines, Syrian Arab Republic, World

    Globally, we are witnessing a rise in the scale, frequency and impact of humanitarian crises on vulnerable people, pushing the international humanitarian system to its limits. Australia plays a vital role in responding to these challenges, both in our immediate region and globally. A new paper developed by ACFID's Humanitarian Reference Group (HRG), involving 14 leading humanitarian Non-Government Organisations (NGO), has been launched today, 8 May. The paper reviews Australia’s humanitarian policy and practice to provide recommendations on ways to improve the effectiveness of humanitarian action – now and into the future.


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Jordan, Kenya, Niger, Philippines, South Sudan, World, Yemen

    This World Humanitarian Day, CARE Canada is calling on governments and international actors to show a renewed commitment to the protection of humanitarian aid workers everywhere.

    “With the recent Ebola outbreak, the ongoing crises in Gaza, South Sudan, Syria, Ukraine and so many other places, humanitarians continue to provide crucial life-saving assistance amidst extremely challenging, sometimes dangerous, circumstances,” said Gillian Barth, president and CEO of CARE Canada.

    “It is fundamental all sides respect the impartiality of aid workers so we can help those most in need.”

    On August 19, World Humanitarian Day is meant to honour aid workers who have lost their lives while on assignment. Over the last decade, direct attacks on aid workers have increased in alarming frequency with an estimated 155 humanitarians having paid the ultimate sacrifice in 2013.

    In early August, at least seven local aid workers were killed in South Sudan, providing yet another example that it is becoming increasingly difficult for humanitarian workers to access people in need.

    CARE is proud to support the global UN World Humanitarian Day campaign honouring “Humanitarian Heroes” worldwide. For a fresh insight into the motivations and challenges local aid workers face, CARE interviewed staff in countries including South Sudan, Niger, Yemen, Kenya, Jordan and the Philippines. The result is our report “Passionate to Save Lives,” a portrait of aid workers serving their communities with grace and ingenuity despite significant obstacles.

    “At CARE, and across our humanitarian partners, there are so many heroes working 24 hours a day, doing fantastic work in some of the worst conditions imaginable. We must support these people and make sure that we can do everything in our power to protect them,” said Jessie Thomson, director of CARE Canada’s Humanitarian Assistance and Emergency Team.

    World Humanitarian Day was created by the UN General Assembly in 2008 in memory of UN Special Envoy to Iraq Sergio Vieira de Mello and 21 other people killed in a terrorist attack on UN headquarters in Baghdad, in 2003.


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    CARE has reached more than 318,000 people with food, shelter and livelihood support

    A year after one of the strongest storms ever recorded hit the Philippines, hundreds of thousands of people have started rebuilding, yet communities continue to need support to fully recover their livelihoods.

    “Typhoon Haiyan left nearly four times as many people homeless as the Indian Ocean tsunami. It hit one of the poorest regions of the country, wiping out coconut farms, rice fields, fishermen’s equipment and people’s businesses,” says Alexandra Maclean, CARE’s country director in the Philippines. “It is commendable how swift the local communities have started the construction of their destroyed houses despite the enormous challenges.”

    More than 16 million people were affected by Typhoon Haiyan (local name “Yolanda”), over twice the population of the Greater Toronto Area.

    Throughout its recovery efforts, CARE has seen women at the forefront of communities’ rebuilding efforts. They have taken on new roles to lead the recovery of their families and their villages.

    “It is exciting to observe the strong role many local women have taken,” says Maclean. “Women are determined to get back on their feet and it is our role to help them do it.”

    CARE empowers women entrepreneurs by providing financial assistance so they can restore their small businesses such as grocery stores, vegetable gardens, rice farms or food stalls. At the same time, CARE and its local partners have trained women in techniques to build back safer houses, knowledge which they pass within their communities, helping others to have a safe roof over their heads.

    Dina Quano, a young mother of two, received shelter materials and a cash grant from CARE. With this help, she rebuilt her house, expanded her piggery and restored her farm.

    “The disaster was harsh, but surviving it has also inspired me to dream again. I want to finish my education, so I could find better work and my kids can be proud of me,” she says.

    Over the past year, CARE and its local partners reached more than 318,000 people with life-saving food, shelter support and financial assistance for livelihoods.

    Thanks to the support of individual Canadians, corporate donors, the Humanitarian Coalition and the Government of Canada, CARE Canada raised more than $2.9 million in Canadian funds towards its Typhoon Haiyan response.

    Overall, CARE International has received a total of $27 million (USD) and is seeking a further $3 million to reach its funding target of $30 million.

    “We are now in the crucial phase to help people get a stable income again and protected from future natural disasters,” says Maclean. “At the same time, 95,000 families are still living in unsafe makeshift shelters during the current typhoon season. We need more durable solutions to protect people’s lives and help them earn a living.”

    -30-

    CARE Canada has spokespeople available in Canada and the Philippines to discuss Typhoon Haiyan.

    CARE International Communications Coordinator Sandra Bulling was with the initial CARE assessment team to visit the affected region days after the typhoon. She has returned to the Philippines and is available to speak with reporters.

    Contact:

    Marie-Jo Proulx
    Communications Manger, CARE Canada
    613.799.7562
    mj.proulx@care.ca


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    Strongest Storm in History

    Super Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms ever recorded in the world, plowed across the central Philippines on November 8, 2013. The lethal combination of winds nearing 300 km/h and heavy rains brought unprecedented devastation.

    An estimated 16.1 million people were affected, with 1.1 million damaged or destroyed homes and as many as 4.1 million people displaced - nearly four times as many as those left homeless by the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. At least 6,300 people lost their lives and another 5.9 million workers lost their livelihoods and source of income to support their families.

    In the immediate aftermath, CARE collaborated with the United Nations and some 40 other agencies to rapidly assess the situation and needs of people across nine provinces. Food, shelter and the restoration of livelihoods were the biggest priorities identified.

    Despite severe logistical challenges due to flooding and blocked or destroyed roads, CARE began distributing food relief packages just eight days after the storm. As we continued to reach needy families with food supplied, CARE also mobilized our local partners to assist in providing survivors with shelter repair kits and initial cash transfers to support the recovery of livelihoods.


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    On November 8, 2013, Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines. An estimated 16.1 million people were affected, with 1.1 million damaged or destroyed homes and as many as 4.1 million people displaced - nearly four times as many as those left homeless by the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. At least 6,300 people were killed and another 5.9 million workers lost their livelihoods and sources of income.

    "Yolanda," as it was locally known, tested the Filipinos' ability to withstand and rise from adversity. This disaster has taught women they can step up and do more beyond their traditional roles. They can rebuild their own houses, restart their livelihoods, work together to support schools, organize community events, and help look after neighbours' needs.

    CARE's experience in the Philippines and around the world shows that natural disasters and armed conflict affect women, men, boys and girls differently. According to "Sex and Age Matter." research carried out by CARE and Feinstein International Center, humanitarian programming is rarely informed by experiences of women and girls and the collection of sex and age disaggregated data.

    In the Philippines, widows became the sole providers and caretakers of their households, women and girls risked sexual and gender-based violence in evacuation centres and makeshift houses, girls faced particular challenges attending school in the aftermath of the storm, pregnant women suffered from unsafe deliveries, and there were protection issues amongst households who lost their houses and livelihoods.


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    Manila, December 4, 2014. As typhoon Hagupit entered the Philippine area of responsibility this morning and is expected to make landfall on Saturday in Eastern Samar, CARE and partners are preparing emergency action plans to assist potentially affected populations. Among the provinces projected to be affected are Eastern Samar, Samar and Leyte, all of which were severely affected by typhoon Haiyan last year.

    According to state weather bureau PAG-ASA, Hagupit (locally known as Ruby) was packing maximum sustained winds of 195 kph near the center and gusts of up to 230 kph. The US Navy’s Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) has classified Hagupit as a super typhoon, under Category Four but which can intensify into Category Five, same category as super typhoon Haiyan which devastated the central Philippines in November last year. The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) meanwhile declared Hagupit as a violent typhoon, the highest in the weather bureau’s classifications of cyclones.

    “CARE is thoroughly monitoring the track of Hagupit, and we have conducted an emergency response meeting with all our partners to set action plans in place. Our teams would be ready to make rapid assessments in affected areas in the next 24 hours after Hagupit hit. We will be ready to respond if needed”, said Alex Maclean, CARE Philippines’ Country Director. “We have just commemorated typhoon Haiyan’s first anniversary, now the people who have gone through so much in the past year and who are just recovering have to prepare for another potential storm impact.”

    CARE is also coordinating with the Philippine government and other NGOs as the country braces for the impact of Hagupit. “Our staff and our partners will be on red alert. They are already on the ground providing information on safety and preparedness to communities which have been affected by Haiyan last year and which are now potentially in the path of another strong typhoon. It is important for everyone to exercise great caution and be better prepared to face this newest storm. It is crucial to underscore, however, that where ever Hagupit may hit, CARE and our partners would be ready to respond as needed”, said Maclean.

    CARE has worked in the Philippines since 1949, providing emergency relief when disaster strikes and helping communities prepare for disasters. CARE's past responses in the Philippines have included typhoon Bopha in 2012 and typhoon Ketsana in 2009.

    CARE's emergency response teams specialise in providing life-saving assistance. CARE has more than six decades of experience helping people prepare for disasters, providing lifesaving assistance when a crisis hits, and helping communities recover after the emergency has passed. CARE, which works in 87 countries around the world, places a special focus on women, children and other vulnerable populations, who are often disproportionately affected by disasters. In 2012, our emergency response and recovery projects reached nearly 14 million people in 40 countries.

    -ENDS-

    CARE Philippine Key Contacts For Media Interviews:
    Spokesperson: Alex Maclean, country director +639175106974
    Information Manager: Dennis Amata +639065011834
    Communications Officer: Winnie Aguilar +639175108093
    *For updates and developments on typhoon Hagupit, please follow us on Twitter: @CAREphl


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    CARE Philippines staff Rona Casil shares her experience with typhoon Hagupit

    “Not another Haiyan, please!”, was my first thought when I learned about a potential super typhoon hitting our region again and including our dear Tacloban in its path.

    The Haiyan nightmare is something I could not imagine my family, the people in Tacloban or the rest of the Philippines experiencing again, only a year after one of the strongest storms on record devastated us.

    Even its name – Hagupit (a Filipino term which means ‘lash’)- evokes fear in us, as if it signifies danger.

    It didn’t help that initially there were a lot of wild reports going around in Tacloban that Hagupit will be stronger than Haiyan; that deadly storm surge would smash us again. It brought back painful memories of the trauma Haiyan left us.

    My mother was beside herself with worries, restless for us to evacuate to another place before Hagupit slams Tacloban. To my utmost relief, the misinformation about Hagupit was soon corrected. Through more accurate and reliable news, we learned that Hagupit’s strength will not be similar to Haiyan and also quite reassuringly, that there would be no storm surge in Tacloban.

    After we became afraid, we decided to be prepared. Two days before its expected landfall, our small family of four (with one 11 year old kid!) worked like a team with a good game plan and ready for battle.

    My mother meticulously packed our things and clothes in plastic bags, I even have to remind her two days before the storm in amusement “Mama, I’m still going to the office! What am I gonna wear?!” We anticipated electricity being cut off, so my brother prepared emergency light by preparing a bulb which he will connect to a car battery for emergency when the typhoon strikes.

    My nephew, who was so traumatized by our Haiyan experience asked for the rosary which he held during last year’s catastrophe and wished to clasp again in time of Hagupit. Our family is big on prayers so it was heart-warming for us to see our youngest member turning to prayers as well for protection from potential danger.

    Report of ‘panic-buying’ hurt me

    And then there were the essential and practical things to think of. Last year, our supply of rice was swept away by the floods. Then, we just placed our staple in plastic bags. This time, we put rice in bottles for better protection. In time of possible disaster - and characteristically Filipino - our family can’t survive without rice so we made sure to secure supplies of it!

    Then we stocked up on food items. Two days before Hagupit, we bought enough supplies, same as almost everyone else in Tacloban.

    Noodles and canned goods were running out of supplies so fast days before the typhoon. Some reports call it “panic buying” which hurt me as a survivor of Haiyan. It was not panic that drove us to buy enough provision for the just-in-case-this-becomes-an-emergency days ahead, but the good sense to prepare. During Haiyan, food became a problem and we wouldn’t want to suffer the threat of hunger again this time.

    During Haiyan, clean and safe water became scarce. So this time we put water in bottles and placed them inside the comfort room/toilet- the safest place in the house they say in time of disasters- and locked the room so in case of floods, our drinking water would be safe.

    We tied our roofs. We secured our important documents. We made sure to just stay in the house during the storm. We did both small and big adjustments this time all to be better prepared for Hagupit.

    ‘Proud of my hometown’

    Then Hagupit came. We felt it from Saturday night to Sunday early morning. The winds were strong but not comparable with the ferocity of Haiyan. There were rains but not anywhere near as heavy as last year’s biggest storm. There were some small floods in Tacloban, but to our greatest relief, as correctly advised by concerned government agencies, there were no storm surges.

    As predicted, power shut down. But our emergency light worked, and gave us a good measure of ease. During Hagupit, I brought out the comfort food I prepared for my family: the local special bread and Filipino favorite, hopia, and lots of chocolates. And such food calmed us as we waited for the typhoon to pass.

    Tacloban appeared like a deserted city days before, during and right after Hagupit. There were hardly any people on the streets. Most establishments were closed. Families preferred to stay home or in evacuation centers.

    Tacloban was prepared. I am so happy and proud of my hometown. I was supposed to be on leave on the first work week after Hagupit, but I decided to report for work to contribute to our efforts to monitor, collect information and respond to the most affected areas in our neighbouring region in Samar. As a survivor of Haiyan and recipient of fellow Filipinos and the world’s generosity during the aftermath of our worst disaster, and having survived yet another typhoon but thankfully unscathed this time, I feel it’s high time I pay it forward and return the same care and solidarity shown to us last year. In fact, I had a friend based in Tacloban but whose family reside in Dolores, Eastern Samar, where Hagupit made its first landfall. After the storm, she could not contact her family. Mobile connection went off. I could perfectly relate to her anxieties as many of our relatives and friends felt the same way last year when communication lines with us were cut off after Haiyan’s devastation.

    So I searched for helpful government numbers she can reach to seek assistance, and because of this small act, my friend was able to reach her family and took away her worries.

    We suffered so much from Haiyan. But we also learned so much from it, especially the value of preparedness and unity.

    CARE is working with the government and local partners to deploy emergency response teams to affected areas to collect information and be ready to distribute relief supplies such as food to communities in need of assistance. CARE and its partners has about 150 staff, and are operational in Manila, Leyte, Samar, Panay and Bicol.


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    MANILA (December 7, 2014) - International aid agency CARE is now preparing response supplies as Typhoon Hagupit makes landfall in the central Philippines.

    The typhoon, which first made landfall late Saturday evening, local time, has brought with it intense rain and wind gusts of more than 200 kilometres per hour, lashing many communities that felt the brunt of last year’s Super Typhoon Haiyan.

    “We’re hearing reports from staff in Samar of fallen trees and electricity poles, as well as, damage to roofs. With the heavy rains causing flooding, houses are being washed out along the coast,” said Alex Maclean, CARE Country Director in the Philippines. “Samar is a fishing community that is one of the poorest areas of the Philippines, so we’re concerned there could be major impacts to people’s livelihoods.”

    Almost 700,000 people were evacuated before Typhoon Hagupit, known in the Philippines as Ruby, made landfall. The UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction has said the evacuation is one of the largest peacetime evacuations ever undertaken.

    Maclean said many of the communities that were being hit by Typhoon Hagupit were now re-living the fear and trauma of last year’s Super Typhoon Haiyan, which killed more than 6,000 people and left over four million homeless.

    “This is mother nature at its most cruel. Just one year after suffering through one of the most ferocious storms ever recorded, families in the central Philippines are now re-living their nightmare.”

    Ms Maclean said CARE was working alongside local emergency authorities to ensure supplies and relief is in place to support families hit by Hagupit.

    “CARE is working alongside Philippines’ authorities to plan damage assessments, to mobilise relief supplies and we will soon be deploying response teams to affected areas. We have been working extensively throughout Leyte and Samar since Haiyan hit, and will continue to do so in the wake of Hagupit.”

    CARE has worked in the Philippines since 1949, providing emergency relief when disaster strikes and helping communities prepare for disasters. CARE's past responses in the Philippines have included Typhoon Ketsana (2009), Typhoon Bopha (2012) and Super Typhoon Haiyan (2013). Over the past 12 months since Haiyan, CARE and its partners in the Philippines have reached more than 318,000 people with life-saving food, shelter support and financial assistance to rebuild their incomes.

    -ENDS-

    For interviews with CARE emergency staff in the Philippines and the UK, please contact 07824 563 810


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    MANILA - ( December 9, 2014)- International aid agency CARE will be distributing food packs to 2,800 families most affected by typhoon Hagupit.

    The typhoon, which made its first landfall on Saturday evening in Eastern Samar, made four other landfalls in several provinces in the Philippines, compelled massive evacuations of about 1 million people and caused damage to people's shelters and livelihoods.

    "CARE and partners will distribute basic food packs containing rice and canned goods to 2,800 of the most affected households in Northern and Eastern Samar, supporting the government in its typhoon response", said Alexandra Maclean, Country Director for CARE Philippines.

    While CARE will support the immediate needs of people most affected by Hagupit, the organization is also looking at the medium and long-term recovery of the communities hit hardest by the typhoon especially the impact on shelter and livelihoods. “Here in Samar we see a lot of damage to banana crops and people have lost their income. This is already one of the poorest regions in the country, and the impact of typhoon Hagupit will push people deeper into poverty”, reports Rachid Boumnijel, CARE Philippines’ Livelihood Advisor, who is currently in Samar.

    CARE is launching an appeal to raise USD 5 million for the most vulnerable families affected by Hagupit. It takes about USD 20 to give food for a family of five members for two weeks, and about USD 15 to assist with immediate shelter needs for those whose homes were damaged by the typhoon.

    "Our teams and local partners on the ground are continuously collecting information about the full extent of Hagupit's damage. While we are all thankful that preparedness such as early evacuations saved many lives, Hagupit has brought lots of rain and sustained winds. We will support communities with emergency supplies and help them recover from this disaster," said Maclean. CARE will mainly focus on providing emergency food and shelter support, such as distributing shelter kits and supporting people with cash assistance.

    The Philippine government is leading the response and coordinating all pledges of support from NGOs and the private sector. CARE will closely work and coordinate with the government for all its interventions for those affected by Hagupit.

    CARE has worked in the Philippines since 1949, providing emergency relief when disaster strike and helping communities prepare for disasters. CARE's past responses in the Philippines have reached more than 318,000 people with life-saving food, shelter support and financial assistance to rebuild their in incomes.

    Media contacts:

    Winnie Aguilar (in Tacloban), CARE Philippines Media & Communications Officer: +639175108093, Winnie.Aguilar@care.org Holly Frew (in Samar), CARE Emergency Communications Officer: +63 915 830 9405 or +63 9494 095 091, hfrew@care.org


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    International aid agency CARE will distribute food packs to families hit by Typhoon Hagupit, as a clearer picture emerges of the extent of the damage.

    Typhoon Hagupit, which made its first landfall on Saturday evening in Eastern Samar, made four other landfalls in several provinces in the Philippines, and saw a massive evacuation of around one million people across the country. CARE is now closely monitoring the storm as it moves further west towards Vietnam.

    Alexandra Maclean, CARE’s Country Director in the Philippines said CARE and its partners will be distributing food packs containing rice and canned goods to nearly 3,000 of the hardest‐hit families in the Philippines provinces of Northern and Eastern Samar.

    “While we are all thankful that early evacuations clearly saved many lives, Hagupit has still brought much rain, and sustained, powerful winds that have battered large parts of the country still reeling from last year’s Super Typhoon Haiyan,” said Ms Maclean.

    “Our focus is now on providing emergency food and shelter to families hit hard by Hagupit, and we will be distributing food, shelter kits and supporting people with cash assistance to get back on their feet in the coming weeks.”

    Rachid Boumnijel, CARE Philippines’ Livelihood Advisor, who is currently in Samar as part of CARE’s damage assessment team, said that while the damage caused by Hagupit was not on the scale of last year’s Super Typhoon Haiyan, many families’ livelihoods and income sources had been lost.

    “This is already one of the poorest regions in the country, and it was hard hit by Super Typhoon Haiyan last year. It’s clear from what we’re seeing here in Samar that many people have lost their income, such as banana crops, in this typhoon. This storm will push many people further into poverty,” said Mr Boumnijel.

    To support CARE’s response in the Philippines following Typhoon Hagupit, Australians can donate to CARE’s Global Emergency Fund (www.care.org.au/global‐emergency‐fund). A donation of $13 will provide a family with a food kit to support them for the coming weeks.

    CARE has worked in the Philippines since 1949, providing emergency relief when disaster strikes and helping communities prepare for disasters. CARE's past responses in the Philippines have included Typhoon Ketsana (2009), Typhoon Bopha (2012) and Super Typhoon Haiyan (2013). Over the past 12 months since Haiyan, CARE and its partners in the Philippines have reached more than 318,000 people with life‐saving food, shelter support and financial assistance to rebuild their incomes.

    ‐ENDS‐

    For interviews with CARE emergency staff, please contact CARE Australia Senior Media Officer Dylan Quinnell on 0412 449 691


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    MANILA- (December 15, 2014)- A few days after typhoon Hagupit hit the Philippines, international aid agency CARE distributed food packs almost 2,000 families in badly-hit villages in Eastern Samar, in coordination with local partners. In the coming days, a total of 3,500 families will have received emergency food rations.

    CARE distributed rice and a variety of canned goods consisting of corned beef, sardines and meat loaf to two of the most affected municipalities including Oras and Dolores, where Hagupit first made landfall, and where residents say food remains a pressing concern, a week after the typhoon.

    Rufina Ogdalia, a 38-year old mother of four children, shares that before Hagupit, her family could afford to buy fish and pork meat for their meals. Now, they make do with rice, and mix salt, soy sauce and cooking oil for viand. This is due to money being scarce these days after the typhoon destroyed their small village convenience store and their farm with coconut trees, banana trees and root crops.

    „These are just some of the municipalities who bore the brunt of Hagupit, and people in these parts of Eastern Samar have been telling our CARE team and our partners that in their areas, Hagupit was stronger and more damaging than super typhoon Haiyan. Like in Rufina’s case, many agricultural activities here have been destroyed or were greatly affected by Hagupit, leaving people without their regular sources of income and food“, says Alexandra Maclean, Country Director for CARE Philippines.

    The typhoon damaged coconut trees, a main source of livelihood for people in this part of Eastern Samar. The local government of Oras shares with CARE that assessments from the Philippine Coconut Authority indicate a 100 percent damage to coconut trees in this municipality. In addition, houses were damaged and crops flooded.

    Rufina’s house made of light materials was totally damaged, leaving them with the double burden of having to repair their shelter and restore their livelihoods, but without any resources to do either.

    „That is why aside from the food assistance to meet the immediate needs of communities and families affected by Hagupit, CARE and partners are also planning to help communities support with shelter and livelihood to boost their recovery“, said Rachid Boumnijel, CARE’s Food and Livelihoods Advisor for the typhoon Haiyan response, who also led CARE’s first batch of food distributions in Eastern Samar.

    CARE has launched a fundraising appeal for USD 5 million to meet the relief and recovery needs of families affected by typhoon Hagupit across Samar. CARE plans to help 5,000 families rebuild their houses and 10,000 families earn an income again.

    The Philippine government is leading the Hagupit response and CARE is working closely with the government to assist its efforts.

    CARE has worked in the Philippines since 1949, providing emergency relief when disaster strikeand helping communities prepare for disasters. CARE's past responses in the Philippines have reached more than 318,000 people with life-saving food, shelter support and financial assistance to rebuild their in incomes.

    Media contact: Winnie Aguilar, CARE Philippines Media & Communications Officer (+639175108093, Winnie.Aguilar@care.org


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Haiti, Indonesia, Nepal, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, South Sudan, Sri Lanka

    Remembering the Tsunami: A Decade of Strengthening Humanitarian Response

    Ten years ago, the global community faced what was one of the biggest tests of humanitarianism in recent history.

    On Dec. 26, 2004, an earthquake rumbled off the coast of Indonesia, triggering a series of devastating tsunamis that struck 14 countries across the Indian Ocean. At least 228,000 people lost their lives and millions more were left homeless.

    A decade later, lessons learned from the tsunami humanitarian response continue to influence and improve how the world responds to disasters today.

    A new report from CARE International marking 10 years since the Indian Ocean tsunami outlines some of the major milestones and innovations in the humanitarian system and in CARE’s own emergency work, and raises questions for how the world will continue to evolve and address emerging challenges in the years ahead.

    “The tsunami was a turning point for the global aid community. Never before had such a massive, coordinated emergency response been launched after a natural disaster. The world succeeded in helping the affected countries rebuild and recover, and the way we respond to and prepare for crises was altered forever,” says Sally Austin, CARE International Head of Emergency Operations who previously worked in Indonesia as CARE’s Tsunami Response Director.

    The global community mobilized with a massive emergency effort. CARE was among the leading humanitarian agencies that responded and worked with affected communities across five countries to reconstruct homes and livelihoods and promote economic and social development, reaching more than 1.3 million people.

    Since the tsunami, the world has faced a decade of disasters – natural, like the 2010 earthquake in Haiti; as a result of conflict, like the ongoing crises in South Sudan and Syria; and outbreaks of disease such as the Ebola virus in West Africa.

    With growing needs, there are emerging challenges both for people affected by disasters and for humanitarian actors. Aid organizations and donors need to be more flexible and innovative; build resilience of communities before, during and after a crisis; and expand partnerships with local communities, governments, civil society groups, the private sector and all who have a stake in responding to crises, according to CARE in its new report Learning from Crisis: Strengthening Humanitarian Response Since the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami.

    “We hope that this report will be used by many, as it will be by CARE itself, to continue to improve our collective humanitarian efforts to ensure we’re being as effective as possible and having the greatest impact in helping people most affected by these crises, particularly women and girls, as they are often disproportionately affected during a disaster,” said Barbara Jackson, CARE International’s Humanitarian Director. “The people who survived the tsunami worked against the odds to rebuild their homes and communities. The best way to honour them, and the memory of those who died in the disaster, is to continue to work together to find new, innovative solutions to help people affected by crises.”

    Return to Aceh, Indonesia, 10 Years Later

    CARE’s team recently returned to Aceh, Indonesia, which was the area worst hit by the tsunami. While the losses of loved ones cannot be forgotten, what was found were communities rebuilt and renewed, able to move on from the tragedy.

    “It has been extraordinary to see the change in Aceh since the tsunami,” says Ibu Sinarti, a midwife who was seriously injured in the disaster 10 years ago. “Things look normal now, and in some places, like this health clinic, they are better. Everyone here was helped, somehow. The world came to help, and we helped each other.”

    NOTE TO EDITORS:

    CARE has staff members available to discuss the Indian Ocean tsunami who were involved in the initial response operations and continue to work for the organization today.

    In particular, Canadian Melanie Brooks was part of CARE’s emergency response team that responded to the tsunami in Indonesia 10 years ago; she recently returned to Aceh to visit the families and communities affected by this disaster and is available to discuss progress achieved a decade later.

    Media contact:

    Marie-Jo Proulx
    Communications Manger, CARE Canada
    613.799.7562
    mj.proulx@care.ca


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    Category 4 storm expected to make landfall Saturday or Sunday.

    Typhoon Maysak (locally known as Chedeng) continues to head towards the Philippines maintaining its strength with maximum sustained winds of 180 km/h near the centre and gusts of up to 215 km/h.

    Maysak, which was already downgraded to a typhoon from being a super typhoon, is still projected to bring heavy rains and strong winds. The typhoon is expected to make landfall by either Saturday evening or Sunday morning in the vicinity of Quezon, Aurora, and Isabela provinces in Northern Philippines.

    CARE is closely monitoring the typhoon situation and coordinating with UNOCHA, the National Disaster Risk Reduction & Management Council and international non-government organisation networks in Manila.

    CARE emergency staff in Manila, Central and Northern Luzon are on stand-by to immediately respond if needed and in coordination with CARE’s local partners present in the areas that will be affected.

    ‘Our emergency team is ready to make rapid assessments in affected areas on the immediate needs of the affected people after the landfall. We will be ready to respond if needed,’ said Alex Maclean, CARE Philippines’ Country Director.

    Local government units have advised communities to prepare for landslides, flashfloods and storm surges.

    CARE has worked in the Philippines since 1949, providing emergency relief when disaster strikes and helping communities prepare for disasters. CARE and our local partners in the Philippines continue to help communities affected by the devastating Typhoon Haiyan in 2013 and last year’s Tyhpoon Hagupit, helping them to recover through shelter repair and disaster-resilient livelihoods.


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    Source: CARE
    Country: Philippines

    CARE is on alert in the Philippines as Category Three Typhoon Noul begins to intensify as it moves closer to the Philippines.

    Typhoon Noul (known locally as Dodong), which is expected to make landfall near the province of Isabela-Cagayan on Sunday, is packing sustained winds of 150 kilometres per hour near its eye, with wind gusts of up to 185 kilometres. Philippines’ state weather bureau reports that there is a possibility for Noul to develop into a super typhoon due to its intensifying patterns.

    CARE teams in Philippines are closely monitoring the typhoon and coordinating with the United Nations Office of the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, the Philippines’ National Disaster Risk Reduction & Management Council, and other aid agencies throughout the Philippines.

    CARE emergency staff in Manila are on standby to immediately respond if needed. CARE has already identified and alerted its suppliers of emergency food packs and water, sanitation and hygiene kits that have presence across all regions should there be a need for an immediate response.

    “Our emergency team is ready to deploy to affected areas and we are ready to respond,” said Elisa Nuada, Acting CARE Philippines’ Country Director.

    CARE has worked in the Philippines since 1949, providing emergency relief when disaster strikes and helping communities prepare for disasters. CARE’s past responses in the Philippines have included Typhoon Hagupit (2014), Typhoon Haiyan (2013), Typhoon Bopha (2012) and Typhoon Ketsana (2009). CARE is continuing to support Typhoon Haiyan and Hagupit-affected communities to help them recover and build disaster-resilient livelihoods.

    CARE has more than six decades of experience helping people prepare for disasters, providing lifesaving assistance when a crisis hits, and helping communities recover after the emergency has passed.

    CARE Australia is an international humanitarian aid organisation fighting poverty, with a special focus on working with women and girls to bring lasting change to their communities.


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    Source: CARE, Netherlands Red Cross, Cordaid, Wetlands International
    Country: Ethiopia, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mali, Nicaragua, Philippines, Uganda, World

    Lessons by Partners for Resilience: moving from output to impact

    by Juriaan Lahr, Head of International Assistance, Netherlands Red Cross

    With the outcome targets established at the start of the programme broadly achieved, the Partners for Resilience (PfR) alliance is now working toward its closing global conference in the Netherlands later this year. PfR’s unique approach integrating disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation, and ecosystem management and restoration, is increasingly endorsed by government and civil society partners. The programme’s annual report for 2014 will be the last of its kind – this article by Juriaan Lahr is an abridged version of his introduction.

    After PfR’s success in quantitative terms for the communities and organizations involved, our focus now is increasingly on ensuring that interventions are cost-effective and sustainable, and able to be replicated and scaled-up.

    Much effort has gone into learning. Country teams have worked on a learning agenda, while researchers from Groningen and Wageningen universities conducted a study that focuses on evidence for the contribution of the PfR approach in enhancing the resilience of local communities – that is, moving from output to impact.

    Since building resilience is a process involving interdependent structures within communities, this requires intensive, focused and sustained efforts.

    Organizations and institutions need to adopt this approach in their strategies; technical, legal and financial support must continue where needed.

    Take-up

    Even though five years is a relatively long period – especially for activities that would normally fall exclusively within disaster management – results will probably become visible only after several more years, if communities experience situations that, in the past, critically affected their coping levels.

    Their ability to reduce losses will be proof of the effectiveness of the integrated PfR approach, blending disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation, and ecosystem management and restoration; it will enable communities to continue on an upward path of development.

    While PfR works in over 500 disaster-prone communities, there are many more places where disaster risks are a recurring threat, aggravated by population growth, uncontrolled development, urbanization, environmental degradation and competition for resources.
    Climate change pushes increasing numbers of vulnerable people into situations that exceed their ability to cope.

    Therefore in 2014, the programme’s penultimate final year, there was also a focus on documenting the activities carried out, collaboration with stakeholders, take-up by governments at various levels, and the organizational set-up of the alliance.

    This will continue in 2015, and the results, together with the outcomes of the academic study, will be presented at the closing Global Conference of Partners for Resilience, planned for the Netherlands in October.

    Lobbying and advocacy

    The partners are engaging in policy dialogues with governments and key stakeholders, bringing local experience to national and international levels and vice versa, to work on policy and funding appropriate for local solutions to local risks.

    Strong civil society organizations play a central role, for in the end the local level is both point of departure and arrival when assisting people.

    PfR is excited that the Netherlands government has recognised the added value of the alliance in reducing disaster risk and safeguarding development by selecting us as strategic partners under the Dialogue and Dissent programme in 2016–2020.

    The focus here will be on lobbying and advocacy, and strengthening civil society organizations to become strong players in this.

    Financial flows need to be tailored for local communities. Pilot community-interventions remain important, not only for the targeted communities but also to render lobbying and advocacy more credible.
    They are the examples that show how building community resilience serves as a return on investment in development efforts, and how such programmes can be included in local and national budgets and plans.


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